The Landscapes - Teguise del Mar al Río
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The Landscapes

 

One of the attractions of this route is the variety of landscapes it crosses and its incredible geological features, even in agricultural areas. Lanzarote is synonymous with volcanoes and the From the Sea to the River route synthesises its wonderful variety of expressions.

Lava fields

The lava landscapes, or malpaises, are found across much of Lanzarote, especially in the Timanfaya area. In the north of the island, the protagonist is the 21,000-year-old volcano of La Corona. The lava flows of Los Ancones, where the trail starts after leaving Costa Teguise, are an example of these mineral landscapes.

 

Los Ancones
Los Ancones

Volcanic cones

Volcanic cones are a constant feature of the island landscape. The beginning of the route passes by two of them: the Tinaguache and Tejida mountains, two volcanic cones of just over 220 metres in altitude that appear in parallel, so much so that the small plain between them is known as “Entremontañas” (between the mountains). Tinaguache has a beautiful open crater facing southeast towards Costa Teguise, perfectly visible from the road.

Tinaguache Volcano
Tinaguache Volcano

Artificial sandy areas

The enarenados are black mosaics, generally rectangular in shape, in which the “picón” or “rofe” volcanic ashes cover the fertile soil as a protective mantle of humidity for cultivation. They are very abundant in the first and second sections, especially around Teseguite.

Artificial sandy area in Teseguite
Artificial sandy area in Teseguite

Vegas

Vega is the name traditionally given to low, flat and fertile areas, and in Lanzarote, it’s the name given to the best cultivation areas. The best example is the Vega de San José route, which extends north from Teguise and Guanapay mountain, from the top of which we can admire its beauty in all its splendour.

Vega and Mountain of Guanapay
Vega and Mountain of Guanapay

Sandy areas

The Jable sandy area occupies almost 90 km2 from west to east. This corridor of wind-blown sands is also a unique agricultural space. There is ephemeral agriculture in Jable, which only began to be used for agriculture well into the 19th century when it was discovered that it conserves and condenses humidity in the environment. Crops in this area were mainly sweet potatoes, but tomatoes, melons, watermelons and other vegetables were also grown, generally those typical of humid and irrigated tropical areas.

Crops in the Jable
Crops in the Jable

Cliffs

The Famara Cliffs, an escarpment around 400 metres high with a length of 25 kilometres and whose southern end is found on Famara Beach, are the most important in Lanzarote. Formed by piles of basaltic lava flows, crossed by dikes and with inserted cones, it is an open book to the island’s geological history.

Famara Cliffs
Famara Cliffs

Beaches

Caleta de Famara and La Graciosa. Lanzarote’s longest beach, more than five kilometres in length, is Famara. Beaten by the winds almost permanently, it’s a surfing paradise, and the scenic setting of the Famara Cliffs make it one of the jewels of the island.

Famara Beach
Famara Beach

Islets

The marine landscape of the north of Lanzarote is dominated by the Chinijo archipelago, the island of La Graciosa and the islets of Alegranza, Montaña Clara, Roque del Este and Roque del Oeste. It is the largest marine reserve in Europe, with 700 square kilometres and a volcanic landscape over the ocean.

The islets from Montaña Colorada
The islets from Montaña Colorada
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